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Faye Claridge - Village Green Screen

Mixed media installation. Meadow Arts commission 2017 for launch at Shrewsbury Folk Festival.

Faye Claridge - Village Green Screen

Mixed media installation. Meadow Arts commission 2017 for launch at Shrewsbury Folk Festival.

Faye Claridge - Village Green Screen

Mixed media installation. Meadow Arts commission 2017 for launch at Shrewsbury Folk Festival.

Faye Claridge - Village Green Screen

Mixed media installation. Meadow Arts commission 2017 for launch at Shrewsbury Folk Festival.

Village Green Screen

Launched at the 2017 Shrewsbury Folk Festival, Faye Claridge’s new art project Village Green Screen, commissioned by Meadow Arts, is waiting to collect people's thoughts on a contentious issue: the ‘Black Face’ tradition in Morris Dancing.

“Part of the project’s intention is to acknowledge unheard voices and challenge assumptions,” says Claridge, who understands that the issue can cause friction and wants to offer a safe place for opinions to be heard.


Responding to public debates about the roots of the tradition of disguising the face with black face paint and its validity in the modern age, Claridge launches her project at Shrewsbury’s popular festival, creating a unique ‘green screen’ booth out of Astroturf, where participants will have their opinions recorded. The setting suggests visitors can be ‘green screened' to any place in the world or any time in history or the future, to test ideas about perspective, roots and change. The artist will also provide a comments box for anonymous responses and an opportunity to take part through social media using the hashtag #VillageGreenScreen.
 
Claridge, whose father was a Morris dancer, grew up in multicultural Birmingham, she says, “It’s not surprising Morris dancers blacking their faces is being questioned (again) now. During Brexit negotiations and mass global migration tensions are high. Within folk traditions, I’m hearing people doubt age-old assumptions and I’m seeing reactions from people feeling their values and rights are under threat. YouTube is being used to share anger, offer explanations and as a place for people to comment, often with strong emotions attached.”


Village Green Screen will travel to other venues; visit our Meadow Projects pages for updated news.

 

Meadow Projects

Faye Claridge

Faye Claridge produces contemporary art works in response to archives and traditions, believing our current and future identities are shaped by ideas about the past. She frequently works site-specifically and with the public, encouraging participation in research, production and installation.

In response to a residency with the Sir Benjamin Stone Collection, Claridge recently produced two major new works, a giant corn dolly sculpture (used as a photography prop with children) and a new photographic series (of young people with museum artefacts). The five-metre-high sculpture, Kern Baby, is spending its first year in the grounds at Compton Verney, Warwickshire, before moving to the Library of Birmingham in 2016. It received very positive media reviews and a good Twitter response, whilst the new photographic series A Child For Sacrifice, was nominated for the MACK First Book Award.

Part of Claridge's early work relating to this has already been purchased for the Rugby Art Collection, with advice from the Contemporary Art Society. Her work is also in the Library of Birmingham Collection, as well as private collections, and has been used to promote a Tate Modern conference and used as the cover for (and discussed within) the book 'Performing Englishness'.

An artist's minigraph on her work was produced in 2014 and other articles and portfolio spreads have appeared in The Guardian, Source and a-n.

Claridge's numerous solo and group exhibitions include shows with the Arts Council Collection, at the Photographers' Gallery and the London Art Fair. She was shortlisted for the Helen Chadwick Fellowship with the British School in Rome and her first London solo show won the accolade of Time Out Exhibition of the Week.

Claridge has also worked internationally with exhibitions in Greece and France and a residency in the Czech Republic. She currently lives in Warwickshire with her young family.

www.fayeclaridge.co.uk

Twitter @fayeclaridge

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