Macrospore

Macrospore

Courtesy Alison Jacques Gallery & New Art Centre, Roche Court  (2005)

By elevating the humble, omnipresent dandelion Macrospore stands as a monument to nature itself. The dandelion is a plant so common that it has become at best invisible and at worst, when it dares to leave the wild unkempt fields and creep up in an immaculate garden, a symbol of anarchy and disorder. However small or ephemeral, a single weed in a perfect garden can easily become an overwhelming focus and destabilise the whole picture. By its sheer scale, weight and solidity Macrospore acts as a taunt to those whose instinct it is to uproot weeds. It counters the vulnerability of the unwanted plant with its threatening sharp metal edges. Macrospore oscillates between beauty and ugliness, its delicate tracery is used to depict a ruggedness we find hard to love, despite our protestations to embrace and protect the natural environment.

Paul Morrison

Born in Liverpool in 1966, Paul Morrison studied at Goldsmiths College 1995-98. Morrisons first solo show was in London in 1996. Since then he has shown widely in the UK, Europe and the USA. He is best known for his black and white landscapes which are at once familiar and foreign. He infuses a sense of urgency, anxiety, and humour into environments that a viewer would normally consider peaceful scenery. He has recently had shows  in Munich, New York, Grenoble and exhibits with Alison Jacques Gallery in London.