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Holly Hendry - Take Good Care of My Baby

Plaster, pigment, baby lotion, 2014. Courtesy the artist. Photo Stefan Handy.

Holly Hendry - Take Good Care of My Baby

Plaster, pigment, baby lotion, 2014. Courtesy the artist. Photo Stefan Handy.

Holly Hendry - Take Good Care of My Baby

Plaster, pigment, baby lotion, 2014. Courtesy the artist. Photo Stefan Handy.

Take Good Care of My Baby

Plaster, pigment, baby lotion, 2014

Courtesy the artist

In the hallway of the now vanished great staircase at Witley Court, Holly Hendry’s sculpture stands like a misplaced fragment, all at once at home and foreign. Referencing the notion of the building block, the sculpture utilises the tensions between building up and crumbling away that are present in the work and echoed around the Court. Take Good Care of My Baby reflects on the architecture of spaces and the layering of architectural history.


The artist references the idea of the building blocks; to let us see those historic building processes that are only revealed when a building falls apart. The idea of the 'kit' also illustrates the way history and culture are made, block on block, one reference after another.

“When making the work, I was looking at restoration processes and how in these specific ancient sites the restoration is made obvious, like a giant 3D puzzle. I was thinking about this in terms of the city I was living in at the time (Newcastle), where the city has been put back together and chunks of the old become part of the architecture of the new”.


Holly Hendry carefully considers the outer border or edge of things. The surface, colour and density of materials are all made visible in her sculptures and installations.

Holly Hendry

Holly Hendry (b. 1990, London, UK) lives in London. Hendry is interested in defining the architecture of spaces by exploring the possibilities, such as surface, colour and density, inherent in a wide range of materials through her installations. The shifting scales and unusual positioning of her works encourage visitors to consider sculpture in dialogue with their surroundings, whilst also considering absence as hollow spaces or voids.

In 2018 Hendry was a fellow at the British School at Rome in 2018 and presented works at Frutta (Rome) and the Liverpool Biennial. She has recently received the inaugural Arts Foundation Award for Experimental Architecture 2019 and will have a solo show at Yorkshire Sculpture Park in September 2019.

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